FAO Mr Martin Byrne @Marty_Byrne

Mr Byrne has previous experience of this and his recent tweet struck a chord with me.

Producing music and video on a smartphone has been bothering me for a fair while now. There are some quality pieces of work produced either partly or mainly on phone handsets, but the video below reinforces for me that the medium is most definitely the message in work like this. The extra attachments, processing time, additional apps, compromises, etc., all seem say that making the art on a smartphone is as important as the art itself.

What this says about the artist I don’t know. What I do know is that less technical effort and expense is required while using slightly more dedicated equipment. 

Are there boundaries, limitations imposed by the phone that inspires truly satisfying envelope-pushing? Can the fixed-focus lens lead to breakthroughs in storytelling, scripting or directing?

Or is it part of the techie trend, reinventing a wheel simply to be seen to have a wheel?

From filming through to special effects, smartphone technology offers all the elements required to make a movie. But will the finished product really be good enough for your local cinema?

Here, we show you how the film was made, give you tips on how to make your own masterpiece and tell you what apps and accessories you might need.

FAO Mr Martin Byrne @Marty_Byrne

Mr Byrne has previous experience of this and his recent tweet struck a chord with me.

Producing music and video on a smartphone has been bothering me for a fair while now. There are some quality pieces of work produced either partly or mainly on phone handsets, but the video below reinforces for me that the medium is most definitely the message in work like this. The extra attachments, processing time, additional apps, compromises, etc., all seem say that making the art on a smartphone is as important as the art itself.

What this says about the artist I don’t know. What I do know is that less technical effort and expense is required while using slightly more dedicated equipment. 

Are there boundaries, limitations imposed by the phone that inspires truly satisfying envelope-pushing? Can the fixed-focus lens lead to breakthroughs in storytelling, scripting or directing?

Or is it part of the techie trend, reinventing a wheel simply to be seen to have a wheel?

From filming through to special effects, smartphone technology offers all the elements required to make a movie. But will the finished product really be good enough for your local cinema?

Here, we show you how the film was made, give you tips on how to make your own masterpiece and tell you what apps and accessories you might need.

 

Childhood Hero

Yuri Gagarin was a childhood hero of mine, the first human in space and a mysterious figure from behind the iron curtain.

In the 70s, without today’s instant fingertip access to all the world’s knowledge, it was impossible for an eight-year-old in Northern Ireland to discover anything more about Gagarin other than that he existed, that he orbited the earth in 1961 and that he had a few years of international celebrity.

I lost sight of my space addiction, and never since thought to learn more about it so I’m pleased, pleasantly surprised and saddened to read this article marking the 50th anniversary of the original human in space.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12460720

A Map of the World.

I’ve been going through my email holding tank where I send interesting things for sending to my friends or writing a little bit about and posting here.
Typically I get a bit behind, so rather than having these gathering dust, I’m putting them on in one place for you, dear reader, to poke through.

Timeline: Eta campaign
‘Tuned’ images from water mission
Google faces competition inquiry
Small dogs may originate from the Middle East, geneticists say
GPS vulnerable to hacker attacks
Death Star
Stunning – Biblical Weapons
Web Security: Are You Part Of The Problem?
UFO investigations unit closed by Ministry of Defence
In pictures – Stalin’s Rude Etchings
Smart hominids

A Map of the World.

I’ve been going through my email holding tank where I send interesting things for sending to my friends or writing a little bit about and posting here.
Typically I get a bit behind, so rather than having these gathering dust, I’m putting them on in one place for you, dear reader, to poke through.

Timeline: Eta campaign
‘Tuned’ images from water mission
Google faces competition inquiry
Small dogs may originate from the Middle East, geneticists say
GPS vulnerable to hacker attacks
Death Star
Stunning – Biblical Weapons
Web Security: Are You Part Of The Problem?
UFO investigations unit closed by Ministry of Defence
In pictures – Stalin’s Rude Etchings
Smart hominids

secret societies

Skull & Bones New!

The murky realm of secret societies has long been a hot topic in both Ivy League and conspiracy circles. The most infamous of these is Yale’s Skull & Bones, a society that has remained ‘secret’ for almost 200 years now.

While its old boy network, mysterious headquarters (affectionately called the Tomb) and curious traditions make it similar to many fraternal organizations that seek to keep its practices secret, Skull & Bones’ prestigious list of members distinguishes it from your average frat. After all, how many fraternities can offer members access to a network that includes Supreme Court Chief Justices, high-ranking CIA officials, business tycoons and Presidents of the United States – most notably George Bush 1 and 2.

With the return of the Bush political dynasty, the 2000 release of the motion picture The Skulls, and now a book called Secrets of the Tomb, by Yale grad, Alexandra Robbins, Skull & Bones has seen a wave of publicity that has led to heightened scrutiny around the club and the influence of its members.

GNN recently paid a visit to the Yale campus to meet with Ms. Robbins as she passed through New Haven on her promotional tour. Not only did we stake out the Tomb to discover that the current Skull & Bones class looks more like a UN meeting than a KKK rally, but we also explored the possibility of the first Bones vs. Bones presidential race in 2004 with incumbent George W. Bush (Bones ’68) squaring off against former Senator John Kerry (Bones ’66). Conspiracy or coincidence?

Read on to get the full skinny here