Another gem from Rick Wayne’s ongoing curation.

Ferenc Pinter (1931 – 2008) was an Italian painter and illustrator. He was born in Liguria to Hungarian father and Italian mother. His name was spelled Pintér Ferenc in Hungarian and he signed most of his works with the Hungarian name order; however in Italy he was known as Ferenc Pintér. In 1940 his family […]

(Art) The Pulp Drama of Ferenc Pinter — Curiomancy (fantastic art + fiction + curiosity)

Projections and forecasts

First this:

Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707) was a German composer whose organ music is still played today. He was a major influence on a far more famous German composer, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). When Bach was a young man, he decided it was crucial for him to experience Buxtehude’s music first-hand. He took a leave of absence from his job and walked over 250 miles to the town where Buxtehude lived. There he received the guidance and inspiration he sought. In 2015, I’d love to see you summon Bach’s determination as you go in quest of the teaching you want and need.

And then this:

“If you have built castles in the air,” said philosopher Henry David Thoreau, “your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.” That may seem like a backward way to approach the building process: erecting the top of the structure first, and later the bottom. But I think this approach is more likely to work for you than it is for any other sign of the zodiac. And now is an excellent time to attend to such a task.

By Silverfish Imperetrix

By Silverfish Imperetrix whose incorrupted eye
Sees through the charms of doctors and their wives
By Salamander Drake and the power that was Undine
Rise to claim Saturn, ring and sky
By those who see with their eyes closed
You’ll know me by my black telescope

Your green tree mantle from which these things derive
A lens of quartz and refract scope
That crystal lens whose crystal rope once
Bound me to those doctors and wives
When my vision was oh, so cloudy
And I saw things through two eyes

I am a sailor on the raging depths
And I know a thing or two
Back to the corner, mates, and over the side
Yes, I know a thing or two

By Silverfish Imperetrix whose incorrupted eye
Sees through the charms of doctors and their wives
By Salamander Drake and the power that was Undine
Rise to claim Saturn, ring and sky
By those who see with their eyes closed
You’ll know me by my black telescope

Before my great conversion when the ridge was closed
Before my visit to the workshop of telescope

By Silverfish Imperetrix whose incorrupted eye
Sees through the charms of doctors and their wives
By Salamander Drake and the power that was Undine
Rise to claim Saturn, ring and sky
By those who see with their eyes closed
You’ll know me by my
Black telescope

Horoscopy

This week’s horoscope is an odd one:

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

If you live on the Danish island of Mando, your only hope for driving your vehicle to the mainland and back is when the tide is low. During those periods, the water often recedes far enough to expose a rough gravel road that’s laid down over a vast mudflat.

Winter storms sometimes make even low-tide passages impossible, though. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, there’s a comparable situation in your life. You can only get from where you are to where you want to go at certain selected times and under certain selected conditions. Make sure you’re thoroughly familiar with those times and conditions.

What Dreams May Come

This is my current horoscope from Freewill Astrology:

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Hebrew word *chalom* means “dream.” In his book *Healing Dreams,* Marc Ian Barasch notes that it’s derived from the verb “to be made healthy and strong.” Linguist Joseph Jastrow says that *chalom* is related to the Hebrew word *hachlama,* which means “recovery, recuperation.” Extrapolating from these poetic hints and riffing on your astrological omens, I’ve got a prescription for you to consider: To build your vitality in the coming weeks, feed your dreams. And I mean “dreams” in both the sense of the nocturnal adventures you have while you’re sleeping and the sweeping daytime visions of what you’d like to become.


I have the feeling something important is happening, some unseen machination, some stars coming right (ch-ch-chhh), because not only is this the second week in which dreams have featured in this horoscope (they don’t normally), it also coincides with both my learning of this, and of a marked shift in my dreaming.

I don’t care how hokey this sounds, significance is personal and wherever you find it.  Unless you’re clinically diagnosed with certain types madness, of course.

I Won’t Be Happy Unless It All Ends In Tragedy.

I mean Tragedy in the sense of not an Epic or a Comedy.  Tragedies tend to be meditations on death, loss and suffering but without any final redemption, whereas Epics, though they touch on the same subjects, end with the protagonist learning an essential truth, becoming stronger for it, and experiencing some form of redemption.
Forgive me if I’m offering you a pre-sucked egg here.

Tragedies can be difficult to sit through and, forgive me for saying this, often seem to be taking themselves far more seriously than necessary.  To quote an esteemed colleague, movies that are hard-going for hard-going’s sake just seem to defeat the purpose…much the same [as] “earnest” movies.
Bill Murray, as one example, has an amazing knack for taking serious, “earnest”, complex roles and injecting both humanity and humour, allowing the viewer to watch and enjoy (because let’s be plain here, we’re not talking about documentaries, we’re talking about work that is designed, marketed and consumed primarily as entertainment) the movie, but which also serves the process of the art much better in that it communicates the human experience involved, adds extra levels of communication between actors and audience and forms connections, bonds, between actors and audience granting those unspoken dimensions a presence onscreen.

As another example I think Deer Hunter was more in the “hard-going for the sake of it” camp, although perhaps it was intended/received as a necessary catharsis for Americans from the Vietnam era, ‘cos heaven knows such a thing was necessary given what the vets experienced both in service and on their return home.

This is in stark contrast with another war movie, Apocalypse Now, which is one of my favourite movies (especially the 45 min longer Redux cut), and, y’know, it barely seems like a war movie at all to me.  I’m a bit of a Joseph Conrad fan, and I really really like the exploration & exposition of personality that his storytelling deals with, and I think Coppola reflected this brilliantly.  The war aspect was just a distracting device through which to explore the otherness of white guys going crackers in the jungle (amongst slightly more weighty topics ;> ).
Better than Romancing the Stone, anyway.

But here, if you fancy some luscious cinematography, find a Russian movie called The Return.  so good.  Also an Epic.  Or its successor, The Banishment, a Tragedy.

World War One Color Photos

I had no idea colour photography was so old, and to find it used in wartime, right in the trenches, has amazed me.
I’ve seen many, many wartime photos but since every single one of them has been black and white, so these colour images seem retrospectively staged. The colours imply a modernity that jars with the historic nature of the content. Perhaps it’s more difficult to believe they’re real because they seem too real, as if the subjects are actors in period costume, glimpsed on-set in-between takes.
Funny thing, perception.

Here’s the link: www.worldwaronecolorphotos.com.

As a post script, here’s Colour Photography on Wikipedia. I shoulda guessed that this was a gaping hole in my knowledge…

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