All Points North.

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Picture-postcard views, coastal architecture like time capsules from the recent and further past, semi-secret coves, unexpected views into the quiet Sunday recreations of others.  All these things afforded by a day lazily walking and driving north along the Antrim Coast.

There is little better than sitting on the rocks in a barely accessible inlet beside a derelict smuggling/mining harbour, cut off from phone signal and GPS, the spring sun heating the rock pools, the waves plunking into gullies, the sky a blue straight from the primal past.

It’s a perfect time and place to sink into your own memory, your own self, to let the stuff of subconscious come forward and live in the light for a while.

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The Night of Broken Glass edited by Uta Gerhardt and Thomas Karlauf ??? review | Books | The Guardian

The Night of Broken Glass: Eyewitness Accounts of Kristallnacht

This riveting book prints a collection of 21 eyewitness accounts by German Jews of the terrible night of 9 November 1938, when, on the orders of Adolf Hitler and his propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, bands of stormtroopers all over Germany and Austria burned down more than 1,000 synagogues and smashed up some 7,500 Jewish-owned shops. The shards of shop windows that littered the streets on the morning of 10 November led Berliners, with typically bitter humour, to dub the events of the previous hours the “Reich Night of Broken Glass”, satirically imitating such Nazi events as the “Reich Day of Labour”