From the archives: EU visitors to have fingerprints taken – Times Online

I was gonna publish this with some comments last year when this article was new, but in waiting for a follow-up, it slipped between the cracks.

Given now that the various security database and mandatory ID measures threatened by the UK government have been all but abandoned, I now wonder if this issue has been revisited by the press, and whether, now that the U.S. government have had their way and forced RFID chips into most nation’s passports and invasive disclosure into everyone’s airport experience, have these plans also been shelved?

From the archives: EU visitors to have fingerprints taken – Times Online

I was gonna publish this with some comments last year when this article was new, but in waiting for a follow-up, it slipped between the cracks.

Given now that the various security database and mandatory ID measures threatened by the UK government have been all but abandoned, I now wonder if this issue has been revisited by the press, and whether, now that the U.S. government have had their way and forced RFID chips into most nation’s passports and invasive disclosure into everyone’s airport experience, have these plans also been shelved?

The Banishment

The considered pace of the camerawork belies the speed at which this story moves.

From the family’s initial move to the country to the Konstantin Lavronenko’s character’s return to that city, only two days pass.

The mounting pain and the points-of-no-return are delivered so quietly that what would be difficult viewing is rendered both gripping and heartbreaking by the actors and director.

This movie rivals Andrei Zvyagintsev’s debut The Return, but repeats nothing from it apart from the refusal to dwell on character history and the gorgeous cinematography.

And the ravine runs through everything.

The Banishment

The considered pace of the camerawork belies the speed at which this story moves.

From the family’s initial move to the country to the Konstantin Lavronenko’s character’s return to that city, only two days pass.

The mounting pain and the points-of-no-return are delivered so quietly that what would be difficult viewing is rendered both gripping and heartbreaking by the actors and director.

This movie rivals Andrei Zvyagintsev’s debut The Return, but repeats nothing from it apart from the refusal to dwell on character history and the gorgeous cinematography.

And the ravine runs through everything.